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FAQ

What are your vaccination requirements for boarding?

We require that dogs be vaccinated against rabies, distemper, parvovirus, and Bordetella (kennel cough) and that cats be vaccinated against rabies, panleukopenia (feline distemper), feline leukemia virus (FeLV), and feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV).

I think my pet ate something that could be poisonous, but he/she seems fine. What should I do?

Don’t panic, but call us right away. If it’s outside our normal business hours, leave a message, and one of our veterinarians will return your call quickly. If your pet is not showing any adverse symptoms, you can also call the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435. You may be charged a consultation fee.

Why can’t my pet see the same veterinarian/veterinary technician each time we visit?

We make every effort to accommodate our clients’ requests. However, there may be circumstances that prevent a certain veterinary team member from being available during your pet’s visit. Scheduling conflicts, emergency situations, and vacation schedules all play a role in their availability. Please feel free to ask for a specific veterinarian or veterinary technician when you schedule your appointment, and we will do what we can facilitate your request. However, please be understanding if we can’t. All of our team members are highly skilled professionals who look forward to your pet’s visit.

I’m worried about my pet’s upcoming surgical procedure. What do you do to help ensure your patients’ safety during surgery?

Our veterinary team takes every precaution so that your pet receives the highest-quality care. We perform a physical exam and preanesthetic testing before surgery and monitor your pet during surgery. During the procedure, a veterinary technician will continually assess your pet’s heart and respiratory rate, blood pressure, and other vital signs to help prevent any anesthetic risk. We also provide appropriate pain medication to keep your pet comfortable during recovery.

Why does it seem like veterinary care can be expensive?

High standards of veterinary care, like those practiced at UVHDC, are very similar to the standard of care provided at human hospitals. And we all know how expensive human healthcare has become! By comparison, veterinary care is still a bargain. Well equipped practices like UVHDC are really miniature hospitals, with many of the same equipment and capabilities of larger human hospitals.

Thanks to advances in veterinary medicine, pets are living longer, which means you may be spending more over the lifetime of your pet. However, in general, the annual cost of caring for a pet hasn’t increased much over the past several decades (Consider how much the costs of many professional services and trades have risen over that same period!). Certain advanced procedures may come at a higher cost, but as the owner, you decide what care you want to provide your pet. Overall, veterinary care is a terrific value for pet owners.

It may seem like you’re paying more for your pet’s care than for your own, but that perception may stem from the fact that you’re paying the entire cost of a service or procedure, rather than a percentage or set fee determined by an insurance company. If you want to save money on your pet’s care, there are several pet insurance plans available. These plans may cover or help keep costs down for many routine veterinary services, prescriptions, medical conditions, and diseases. We also offer Care Credit, a third-party healthcare line of credit as an option for those clients that want or need financial assistance.

Which pet food should I feed my dog/cat?

The answer is different for each pet, although many commercially available foods are fine to feed healthy dogs and cats. You can look for a nutritional adequacy statement from the Association of American Feed Control Officials (AAFCO), as well as the words “complete and balanced.” Pets’ nutritional needs do change, depending on their life stage and health. We can recommend a pet food, as well as give you advice on deciphering ingredient lists and determining how much to feed your pet.

I recently lost my pet, and I’m having trouble dealing with the loss. Where can I find help?

Losing a pet can be extremely upsetting and hard to move beyond. We have such a close bond with our pets, so letting go is never easy. You can contact us for recommendations to help you through this sad transition.

My pet needs to have surgery. Should I be worried about the anesthesia?

Modern anesthesia is generally quite safe. We will perform a physical examination and run blood tests before all procedures requiring general anesthesia to make sure your pet doesn’t have any hidden health issues. In addition, a skilled veterinary technician will be monitoring your pet’s vital signs during the procedure, to ensure your pet’s safety or to catch and treat any potential concerns as quickly as possible. Anesthesia and patient monitoring vary greatly from clinic to clinic. Ask us what we do to protect your pet before, during, and after the use of anesthesia.

Can I get health insurance for my pet? If so, what’s covered?

Several companies offer health insurance for dogs and cats (and other pets). These plans have premiums and deductibles, just like human health insurance plans. The premiums and deductibles vary based on the level of coverage you select. Many routine services, such as office visits and diagnostic testing, are covered, as well as prescriptions, procedures, and surgeries for a wide variety of diseases and conditions. However, there are restrictions and limits, as well as certain guidelines to follow, including making sure your pet receives regular preventive care.